Rising upperclassmen face consequences for failing the fitness test

Because of an oversight by CVHS, around 90 rising juniors and seniors do not know that they may be required to take physical education (PE) classes for their final years of high school. Those who have not passed the mandated California physical fitness test in either their freshman or sophomore years are required to take four years of PE, something that had not been enforced previously despite the state’s requirement.

The physical fitness test is typically administered in grades five, seven, and nine, and dictates whether or not a student must take a PE class all four years of high school. It consists of six tests, five of which must be passed in order to pass the test as a whole and be exempt from all four years of PE. CVHS students that pass are only required to take the class as underclassmen. 30 juniors and transfer students will have to take the test this year because they have never taken it before.

“It’s part of a mandate to make sure students are healthy. The idea is that you want students doing physical activity as much as possible,” said Assistant Principal Jesse Hansen. Components of the test range from sit ups to body mass index measurements, targeted to assess each student’s physical capability.

Current sophomores who have not passed the test may not be aware of it, but they are subject to two additional years of PE, which could potentially limit the freedom they have in choosing their classes. PE would replace their choice of elective, rather than what they had already settled on.

Because they are not returning next school year and therefore can’t retake PE, seniors will not be affected even if they have not passed. They will not be required to retake the test. Failing the fitness exam does not restrict anyone from graduating, but it may conflict with possible college requirements.

Current juniors that failed and were not enrolled in PE this year, as well as transfer students, had another chance to retake the test this school year, but without much warning in advance. If they fail, they will have to meet with administrators to establish an individualized plan to reshape their physical activity.

“We wanted to get ourselves in line with the legal policies,” said Hansen.

Although it may seem like an inconvenience, it is necessary, according to the state of California. CVHS plans to further inform the students that did not pass the exam soon.

 

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